HOUSE & HOMME
{This blog was formerly called Bjorn's Randoms} I'm a Toronto-based interior designer, that's really more than just that. Throughout the weekdays, between 9am to 5pm (EST), I sometimes post things I find online that are usually related to design in some way or the other. But after that, I have the 'randoms' queued up! You see my interest in design, art, illustration, architecture, photography, travel, & fashion, the things that make me laugh, that make me think, the things that excite me, and the things that I love. Soon, it won't be so random after all.
HOUSE & HOMME
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kateoplis:

Huxley vs. Orwell
kateoplis:

Huxley vs. Orwell
kateoplis:

Huxley vs. Orwell
kateoplis:

Huxley vs. Orwell
kateoplis:

Huxley vs. Orwell
kateoplis:

Huxley vs. Orwell
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georgianadesign:

Hidden hall laundry, Chicago. 2 Design Group.
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benoitviaene:

Design: Benoit Viaene
Fireplace: De Puydt nv (Metalfire)
Photo: Jan Verlinden
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cabbagerose:

peek-a-boo parisian apartments: the residence poissonniers/maast
via: trendhunter
cabbagerose:

peek-a-boo parisian apartments: the residence poissonniers/maast
via: trendhunter
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bothsidesguys:

LE CLOS Y, PARIS by DAI SUGASAWA
archdaily.com
bothsidesguys:

LE CLOS Y, PARIS by DAI SUGASAWA
archdaily.com
bothsidesguys:

LE CLOS Y, PARIS by DAI SUGASAWA
archdaily.com
bothsidesguys:

LE CLOS Y, PARIS by DAI SUGASAWA
archdaily.com
bothsidesguys:

LE CLOS Y, PARIS by DAI SUGASAWA
archdaily.com
bothsidesguys:

LE CLOS Y, PARIS by DAI SUGASAWA
archdaily.com
bothsidesguys:

LE CLOS Y, PARIS by DAI SUGASAWA
archdaily.com
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ava-schoengeist:

Pratt & Larson / Hex Pattern no. 5 / via Interior Design Magazine
http://productfind.interiordesign.net
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archatlas:

Democrazy Peter Cook  & Yael Reisner
BCN RE.SET - Ephemeral architecture circuit in the street
archatlas:

Democrazy Peter Cook  & Yael Reisner
BCN RE.SET - Ephemeral architecture circuit in the street
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kanyewesticle:

sigsauer-ist:

goodbye

Genius
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nihilnovosubsole:

Jakub Godziszewski - Part of The Shadows series 2014
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{Somehow simultaneously new and familiar, the interiors of the American Trade Hotel in Panama City has a balance of swanky retro, cool colonial deco, and a laid-back easy attitude that is very modern. Bertoia chairs on ornately patterned floors? It feels like the perfect cocktail of international style and local context.}
Located in the heart of the Casco Viejo on Herrera Square (Panamas’ Old Town, which is also a Unesco World Heritage Site), the American Trade Hotel was built in 1917 (designed by Leonardo Villanueva Meyer, the founder of Panama’s ”Bellavistana” style of architecture) as the American Trade Developing Building, in the boom years following the completion of the Panama Canal. The four story building was the tallest in the country, and housed a department store in the lower floors and apartments on top. It soon became the meeting place of la crème de le crème that came through Panama City. In the 60s and 70s along with the rest of the Casco Viejo, it was however, abandoned and vandalized, before it was thankfully acquired, in 2007, byConservatorio (a development agency led by American ex pat KC Hardin dedicated to buying, restoring and operating buildings in the Casco Viejo) with a vision of restoring it to its former glory.
Atelier ACE, along with veteran collaborators Commune Design came on board and the result is a lofty, colonial mélange of cultures and times gone buy. With great respect to its heritage, the neighborhood and the history associated with it, the team created a new legacy blending beautifully the old and the new, the traditional with the contemporary and the cosmopolitan with the bohemian.  Largely inspired by its strategic location on the crossroads between East and West, the design features a bric-a-brac of cultures and influences, from Europe to Latin America. Handmade patterned tiling is perfectly juxtaposed against the Bertoia side chairs by Knoll in the lobby bar and 2nd floor courtyard. Further beautiful features include the Viennese rocking chair and the indigenous indoor plants which are in perfect harmony with the soft leather and wireframe pieces, and the numerous antiques scattered throughout (especially in the Hemingway-esque library/reading room). There is an indoor courtyard, an outdoor pool with a view over the old town and the ever-changing Panamanian skyline, as well as a small gym. All 50 rooms are different in layout and size, but all feature stunning views of the cathedral, the neighboring colonial streets or the Plaza, high ceilings, large windows or balconies, vintage light switches, and are stocked with soothing Aesop toiletries. The highlight? The wonderful wide planks that make up the floors of all rooms, are nothing else than sunken logs which have been salvaged from the canal. And that is exactly what makes this property so special: Attention to detail, attention to every design feature, elements that blend in and will age well in synch with their surroundings in the charming Casco Viejo. This is the new face of Panama, and it is looking absolutely fabulously chic – in a uniquely Panamanian way.
{Somehow simultaneously new and familiar, the interiors of the American Trade Hotel in Panama City has a balance of swanky retro, cool colonial deco, and a laid-back easy attitude that is very modern. Bertoia chairs on ornately patterned floors? It feels like the perfect cocktail of international style and local context.}
Located in the heart of the Casco Viejo on Herrera Square (Panamas’ Old Town, which is also a Unesco World Heritage Site), the American Trade Hotel was built in 1917 (designed by Leonardo Villanueva Meyer, the founder of Panama’s ”Bellavistana” style of architecture) as the American Trade Developing Building, in the boom years following the completion of the Panama Canal. The four story building was the tallest in the country, and housed a department store in the lower floors and apartments on top. It soon became the meeting place of la crème de le crème that came through Panama City. In the 60s and 70s along with the rest of the Casco Viejo, it was however, abandoned and vandalized, before it was thankfully acquired, in 2007, byConservatorio (a development agency led by American ex pat KC Hardin dedicated to buying, restoring and operating buildings in the Casco Viejo) with a vision of restoring it to its former glory.
Atelier ACE, along with veteran collaborators Commune Design came on board and the result is a lofty, colonial mélange of cultures and times gone buy. With great respect to its heritage, the neighborhood and the history associated with it, the team created a new legacy blending beautifully the old and the new, the traditional with the contemporary and the cosmopolitan with the bohemian.  Largely inspired by its strategic location on the crossroads between East and West, the design features a bric-a-brac of cultures and influences, from Europe to Latin America. Handmade patterned tiling is perfectly juxtaposed against the Bertoia side chairs by Knoll in the lobby bar and 2nd floor courtyard. Further beautiful features include the Viennese rocking chair and the indigenous indoor plants which are in perfect harmony with the soft leather and wireframe pieces, and the numerous antiques scattered throughout (especially in the Hemingway-esque library/reading room). There is an indoor courtyard, an outdoor pool with a view over the old town and the ever-changing Panamanian skyline, as well as a small gym. All 50 rooms are different in layout and size, but all feature stunning views of the cathedral, the neighboring colonial streets or the Plaza, high ceilings, large windows or balconies, vintage light switches, and are stocked with soothing Aesop toiletries. The highlight? The wonderful wide planks that make up the floors of all rooms, are nothing else than sunken logs which have been salvaged from the canal. And that is exactly what makes this property so special: Attention to detail, attention to every design feature, elements that blend in and will age well in synch with their surroundings in the charming Casco Viejo. This is the new face of Panama, and it is looking absolutely fabulously chic – in a uniquely Panamanian way.
{Somehow simultaneously new and familiar, the interiors of the American Trade Hotel in Panama City has a balance of swanky retro, cool colonial deco, and a laid-back easy attitude that is very modern. Bertoia chairs on ornately patterned floors? It feels like the perfect cocktail of international style and local context.}
Located in the heart of the Casco Viejo on Herrera Square (Panamas’ Old Town, which is also a Unesco World Heritage Site), the American Trade Hotel was built in 1917 (designed by Leonardo Villanueva Meyer, the founder of Panama’s ”Bellavistana” style of architecture) as the American Trade Developing Building, in the boom years following the completion of the Panama Canal. The four story building was the tallest in the country, and housed a department store in the lower floors and apartments on top. It soon became the meeting place of la crème de le crème that came through Panama City. In the 60s and 70s along with the rest of the Casco Viejo, it was however, abandoned and vandalized, before it was thankfully acquired, in 2007, byConservatorio (a development agency led by American ex pat KC Hardin dedicated to buying, restoring and operating buildings in the Casco Viejo) with a vision of restoring it to its former glory.
Atelier ACE, along with veteran collaborators Commune Design came on board and the result is a lofty, colonial mélange of cultures and times gone buy. With great respect to its heritage, the neighborhood and the history associated with it, the team created a new legacy blending beautifully the old and the new, the traditional with the contemporary and the cosmopolitan with the bohemian.  Largely inspired by its strategic location on the crossroads between East and West, the design features a bric-a-brac of cultures and influences, from Europe to Latin America. Handmade patterned tiling is perfectly juxtaposed against the Bertoia side chairs by Knoll in the lobby bar and 2nd floor courtyard. Further beautiful features include the Viennese rocking chair and the indigenous indoor plants which are in perfect harmony with the soft leather and wireframe pieces, and the numerous antiques scattered throughout (especially in the Hemingway-esque library/reading room). There is an indoor courtyard, an outdoor pool with a view over the old town and the ever-changing Panamanian skyline, as well as a small gym. All 50 rooms are different in layout and size, but all feature stunning views of the cathedral, the neighboring colonial streets or the Plaza, high ceilings, large windows or balconies, vintage light switches, and are stocked with soothing Aesop toiletries. The highlight? The wonderful wide planks that make up the floors of all rooms, are nothing else than sunken logs which have been salvaged from the canal. And that is exactly what makes this property so special: Attention to detail, attention to every design feature, elements that blend in and will age well in synch with their surroundings in the charming Casco Viejo. This is the new face of Panama, and it is looking absolutely fabulously chic – in a uniquely Panamanian way.
{Somehow simultaneously new and familiar, the interiors of the American Trade Hotel in Panama City has a balance of swanky retro, cool colonial deco, and a laid-back easy attitude that is very modern. Bertoia chairs on ornately patterned floors? It feels like the perfect cocktail of international style and local context.}
Located in the heart of the Casco Viejo on Herrera Square (Panamas’ Old Town, which is also a Unesco World Heritage Site), the American Trade Hotel was built in 1917 (designed by Leonardo Villanueva Meyer, the founder of Panama’s ”Bellavistana” style of architecture) as the American Trade Developing Building, in the boom years following the completion of the Panama Canal. The four story building was the tallest in the country, and housed a department store in the lower floors and apartments on top. It soon became the meeting place of la crème de le crème that came through Panama City. In the 60s and 70s along with the rest of the Casco Viejo, it was however, abandoned and vandalized, before it was thankfully acquired, in 2007, byConservatorio (a development agency led by American ex pat KC Hardin dedicated to buying, restoring and operating buildings in the Casco Viejo) with a vision of restoring it to its former glory.
Atelier ACE, along with veteran collaborators Commune Design came on board and the result is a lofty, colonial mélange of cultures and times gone buy. With great respect to its heritage, the neighborhood and the history associated with it, the team created a new legacy blending beautifully the old and the new, the traditional with the contemporary and the cosmopolitan with the bohemian.  Largely inspired by its strategic location on the crossroads between East and West, the design features a bric-a-brac of cultures and influences, from Europe to Latin America. Handmade patterned tiling is perfectly juxtaposed against the Bertoia side chairs by Knoll in the lobby bar and 2nd floor courtyard. Further beautiful features include the Viennese rocking chair and the indigenous indoor plants which are in perfect harmony with the soft leather and wireframe pieces, and the numerous antiques scattered throughout (especially in the Hemingway-esque library/reading room). There is an indoor courtyard, an outdoor pool with a view over the old town and the ever-changing Panamanian skyline, as well as a small gym. All 50 rooms are different in layout and size, but all feature stunning views of the cathedral, the neighboring colonial streets or the Plaza, high ceilings, large windows or balconies, vintage light switches, and are stocked with soothing Aesop toiletries. The highlight? The wonderful wide planks that make up the floors of all rooms, are nothing else than sunken logs which have been salvaged from the canal. And that is exactly what makes this property so special: Attention to detail, attention to every design feature, elements that blend in and will age well in synch with their surroundings in the charming Casco Viejo. This is the new face of Panama, and it is looking absolutely fabulously chic – in a uniquely Panamanian way.
{Somehow simultaneously new and familiar, the interiors of the American Trade Hotel in Panama City has a balance of swanky retro, cool colonial deco, and a laid-back easy attitude that is very modern. Bertoia chairs on ornately patterned floors? It feels like the perfect cocktail of international style and local context.}
Located in the heart of the Casco Viejo on Herrera Square (Panamas’ Old Town, which is also a Unesco World Heritage Site), the American Trade Hotel was built in 1917 (designed by Leonardo Villanueva Meyer, the founder of Panama’s ”Bellavistana” style of architecture) as the American Trade Developing Building, in the boom years following the completion of the Panama Canal. The four story building was the tallest in the country, and housed a department store in the lower floors and apartments on top. It soon became the meeting place of la crème de le crème that came through Panama City. In the 60s and 70s along with the rest of the Casco Viejo, it was however, abandoned and vandalized, before it was thankfully acquired, in 2007, byConservatorio (a development agency led by American ex pat KC Hardin dedicated to buying, restoring and operating buildings in the Casco Viejo) with a vision of restoring it to its former glory.
Atelier ACE, along with veteran collaborators Commune Design came on board and the result is a lofty, colonial mélange of cultures and times gone buy. With great respect to its heritage, the neighborhood and the history associated with it, the team created a new legacy blending beautifully the old and the new, the traditional with the contemporary and the cosmopolitan with the bohemian.  Largely inspired by its strategic location on the crossroads between East and West, the design features a bric-a-brac of cultures and influences, from Europe to Latin America. Handmade patterned tiling is perfectly juxtaposed against the Bertoia side chairs by Knoll in the lobby bar and 2nd floor courtyard. Further beautiful features include the Viennese rocking chair and the indigenous indoor plants which are in perfect harmony with the soft leather and wireframe pieces, and the numerous antiques scattered throughout (especially in the Hemingway-esque library/reading room). There is an indoor courtyard, an outdoor pool with a view over the old town and the ever-changing Panamanian skyline, as well as a small gym. All 50 rooms are different in layout and size, but all feature stunning views of the cathedral, the neighboring colonial streets or the Plaza, high ceilings, large windows or balconies, vintage light switches, and are stocked with soothing Aesop toiletries. The highlight? The wonderful wide planks that make up the floors of all rooms, are nothing else than sunken logs which have been salvaged from the canal. And that is exactly what makes this property so special: Attention to detail, attention to every design feature, elements that blend in and will age well in synch with their surroundings in the charming Casco Viejo. This is the new face of Panama, and it is looking absolutely fabulously chic – in a uniquely Panamanian way.
{Somehow simultaneously new and familiar, the interiors of the American Trade Hotel in Panama City has a balance of swanky retro, cool colonial deco, and a laid-back easy attitude that is very modern. Bertoia chairs on ornately patterned floors? It feels like the perfect cocktail of international style and local context.}
Located in the heart of the Casco Viejo on Herrera Square (Panamas’ Old Town, which is also a Unesco World Heritage Site), the American Trade Hotel was built in 1917 (designed by Leonardo Villanueva Meyer, the founder of Panama’s ”Bellavistana” style of architecture) as the American Trade Developing Building, in the boom years following the completion of the Panama Canal. The four story building was the tallest in the country, and housed a department store in the lower floors and apartments on top. It soon became the meeting place of la crème de le crème that came through Panama City. In the 60s and 70s along with the rest of the Casco Viejo, it was however, abandoned and vandalized, before it was thankfully acquired, in 2007, byConservatorio (a development agency led by American ex pat KC Hardin dedicated to buying, restoring and operating buildings in the Casco Viejo) with a vision of restoring it to its former glory.
Atelier ACE, along with veteran collaborators Commune Design came on board and the result is a lofty, colonial mélange of cultures and times gone buy. With great respect to its heritage, the neighborhood and the history associated with it, the team created a new legacy blending beautifully the old and the new, the traditional with the contemporary and the cosmopolitan with the bohemian.  Largely inspired by its strategic location on the crossroads between East and West, the design features a bric-a-brac of cultures and influences, from Europe to Latin America. Handmade patterned tiling is perfectly juxtaposed against the Bertoia side chairs by Knoll in the lobby bar and 2nd floor courtyard. Further beautiful features include the Viennese rocking chair and the indigenous indoor plants which are in perfect harmony with the soft leather and wireframe pieces, and the numerous antiques scattered throughout (especially in the Hemingway-esque library/reading room). There is an indoor courtyard, an outdoor pool with a view over the old town and the ever-changing Panamanian skyline, as well as a small gym. All 50 rooms are different in layout and size, but all feature stunning views of the cathedral, the neighboring colonial streets or the Plaza, high ceilings, large windows or balconies, vintage light switches, and are stocked with soothing Aesop toiletries. The highlight? The wonderful wide planks that make up the floors of all rooms, are nothing else than sunken logs which have been salvaged from the canal. And that is exactly what makes this property so special: Attention to detail, attention to every design feature, elements that blend in and will age well in synch with their surroundings in the charming Casco Viejo. This is the new face of Panama, and it is looking absolutely fabulously chic – in a uniquely Panamanian way.
{Somehow simultaneously new and familiar, the interiors of the American Trade Hotel in Panama City has a balance of swanky retro, cool colonial deco, and a laid-back easy attitude that is very modern. Bertoia chairs on ornately patterned floors? It feels like the perfect cocktail of international style and local context.}
Located in the heart of the Casco Viejo on Herrera Square (Panamas’ Old Town, which is also a Unesco World Heritage Site), the American Trade Hotel was built in 1917 (designed by Leonardo Villanueva Meyer, the founder of Panama’s ”Bellavistana” style of architecture) as the American Trade Developing Building, in the boom years following the completion of the Panama Canal. The four story building was the tallest in the country, and housed a department store in the lower floors and apartments on top. It soon became the meeting place of la crème de le crème that came through Panama City. In the 60s and 70s along with the rest of the Casco Viejo, it was however, abandoned and vandalized, before it was thankfully acquired, in 2007, byConservatorio (a development agency led by American ex pat KC Hardin dedicated to buying, restoring and operating buildings in the Casco Viejo) with a vision of restoring it to its former glory.
Atelier ACE, along with veteran collaborators Commune Design came on board and the result is a lofty, colonial mélange of cultures and times gone buy. With great respect to its heritage, the neighborhood and the history associated with it, the team created a new legacy blending beautifully the old and the new, the traditional with the contemporary and the cosmopolitan with the bohemian.  Largely inspired by its strategic location on the crossroads between East and West, the design features a bric-a-brac of cultures and influences, from Europe to Latin America. Handmade patterned tiling is perfectly juxtaposed against the Bertoia side chairs by Knoll in the lobby bar and 2nd floor courtyard. Further beautiful features include the Viennese rocking chair and the indigenous indoor plants which are in perfect harmony with the soft leather and wireframe pieces, and the numerous antiques scattered throughout (especially in the Hemingway-esque library/reading room). There is an indoor courtyard, an outdoor pool with a view over the old town and the ever-changing Panamanian skyline, as well as a small gym. All 50 rooms are different in layout and size, but all feature stunning views of the cathedral, the neighboring colonial streets or the Plaza, high ceilings, large windows or balconies, vintage light switches, and are stocked with soothing Aesop toiletries. The highlight? The wonderful wide planks that make up the floors of all rooms, are nothing else than sunken logs which have been salvaged from the canal. And that is exactly what makes this property so special: Attention to detail, attention to every design feature, elements that blend in and will age well in synch with their surroundings in the charming Casco Viejo. This is the new face of Panama, and it is looking absolutely fabulously chic – in a uniquely Panamanian way.
{Somehow simultaneously new and familiar, the interiors of the American Trade Hotel in Panama City has a balance of swanky retro, cool colonial deco, and a laid-back easy attitude that is very modern. Bertoia chairs on ornately patterned floors? It feels like the perfect cocktail of international style and local context.}
Located in the heart of the Casco Viejo on Herrera Square (Panamas’ Old Town, which is also a Unesco World Heritage Site), the American Trade Hotel was built in 1917 (designed by Leonardo Villanueva Meyer, the founder of Panama’s ”Bellavistana” style of architecture) as the American Trade Developing Building, in the boom years following the completion of the Panama Canal. The four story building was the tallest in the country, and housed a department store in the lower floors and apartments on top. It soon became the meeting place of la crème de le crème that came through Panama City. In the 60s and 70s along with the rest of the Casco Viejo, it was however, abandoned and vandalized, before it was thankfully acquired, in 2007, byConservatorio (a development agency led by American ex pat KC Hardin dedicated to buying, restoring and operating buildings in the Casco Viejo) with a vision of restoring it to its former glory.
Atelier ACE, along with veteran collaborators Commune Design came on board and the result is a lofty, colonial mélange of cultures and times gone buy. With great respect to its heritage, the neighborhood and the history associated with it, the team created a new legacy blending beautifully the old and the new, the traditional with the contemporary and the cosmopolitan with the bohemian.  Largely inspired by its strategic location on the crossroads between East and West, the design features a bric-a-brac of cultures and influences, from Europe to Latin America. Handmade patterned tiling is perfectly juxtaposed against the Bertoia side chairs by Knoll in the lobby bar and 2nd floor courtyard. Further beautiful features include the Viennese rocking chair and the indigenous indoor plants which are in perfect harmony with the soft leather and wireframe pieces, and the numerous antiques scattered throughout (especially in the Hemingway-esque library/reading room). There is an indoor courtyard, an outdoor pool with a view over the old town and the ever-changing Panamanian skyline, as well as a small gym. All 50 rooms are different in layout and size, but all feature stunning views of the cathedral, the neighboring colonial streets or the Plaza, high ceilings, large windows or balconies, vintage light switches, and are stocked with soothing Aesop toiletries. The highlight? The wonderful wide planks that make up the floors of all rooms, are nothing else than sunken logs which have been salvaged from the canal. And that is exactly what makes this property so special: Attention to detail, attention to every design feature, elements that blend in and will age well in synch with their surroundings in the charming Casco Viejo. This is the new face of Panama, and it is looking absolutely fabulously chic – in a uniquely Panamanian way.
{Somehow simultaneously new and familiar, the interiors of the American Trade Hotel in Panama City has a balance of swanky retro, cool colonial deco, and a laid-back easy attitude that is very modern. Bertoia chairs on ornately patterned floors? It feels like the perfect cocktail of international style and local context.}
Located in the heart of the Casco Viejo on Herrera Square (Panamas’ Old Town, which is also a Unesco World Heritage Site), the American Trade Hotel was built in 1917 (designed by Leonardo Villanueva Meyer, the founder of Panama’s ”Bellavistana” style of architecture) as the American Trade Developing Building, in the boom years following the completion of the Panama Canal. The four story building was the tallest in the country, and housed a department store in the lower floors and apartments on top. It soon became the meeting place of la crème de le crème that came through Panama City. In the 60s and 70s along with the rest of the Casco Viejo, it was however, abandoned and vandalized, before it was thankfully acquired, in 2007, byConservatorio (a development agency led by American ex pat KC Hardin dedicated to buying, restoring and operating buildings in the Casco Viejo) with a vision of restoring it to its former glory.
Atelier ACE, along with veteran collaborators Commune Design came on board and the result is a lofty, colonial mélange of cultures and times gone buy. With great respect to its heritage, the neighborhood and the history associated with it, the team created a new legacy blending beautifully the old and the new, the traditional with the contemporary and the cosmopolitan with the bohemian.  Largely inspired by its strategic location on the crossroads between East and West, the design features a bric-a-brac of cultures and influences, from Europe to Latin America. Handmade patterned tiling is perfectly juxtaposed against the Bertoia side chairs by Knoll in the lobby bar and 2nd floor courtyard. Further beautiful features include the Viennese rocking chair and the indigenous indoor plants which are in perfect harmony with the soft leather and wireframe pieces, and the numerous antiques scattered throughout (especially in the Hemingway-esque library/reading room). There is an indoor courtyard, an outdoor pool with a view over the old town and the ever-changing Panamanian skyline, as well as a small gym. All 50 rooms are different in layout and size, but all feature stunning views of the cathedral, the neighboring colonial streets or the Plaza, high ceilings, large windows or balconies, vintage light switches, and are stocked with soothing Aesop toiletries. The highlight? The wonderful wide planks that make up the floors of all rooms, are nothing else than sunken logs which have been salvaged from the canal. And that is exactly what makes this property so special: Attention to detail, attention to every design feature, elements that blend in and will age well in synch with their surroundings in the charming Casco Viejo. This is the new face of Panama, and it is looking absolutely fabulously chic – in a uniquely Panamanian way.
{Somehow simultaneously new and familiar, the interiors of the American Trade Hotel in Panama City has a balance of swanky retro, cool colonial deco, and a laid-back easy attitude that is very modern. Bertoia chairs on ornately patterned floors? It feels like the perfect cocktail of international style and local context.}
Located in the heart of the Casco Viejo on Herrera Square (Panamas’ Old Town, which is also a Unesco World Heritage Site), the American Trade Hotel was built in 1917 (designed by Leonardo Villanueva Meyer, the founder of Panama’s ”Bellavistana” style of architecture) as the American Trade Developing Building, in the boom years following the completion of the Panama Canal. The four story building was the tallest in the country, and housed a department store in the lower floors and apartments on top. It soon became the meeting place of la crème de le crème that came through Panama City. In the 60s and 70s along with the rest of the Casco Viejo, it was however, abandoned and vandalized, before it was thankfully acquired, in 2007, byConservatorio (a development agency led by American ex pat KC Hardin dedicated to buying, restoring and operating buildings in the Casco Viejo) with a vision of restoring it to its former glory.
Atelier ACE, along with veteran collaborators Commune Design came on board and the result is a lofty, colonial mélange of cultures and times gone buy. With great respect to its heritage, the neighborhood and the history associated with it, the team created a new legacy blending beautifully the old and the new, the traditional with the contemporary and the cosmopolitan with the bohemian.  Largely inspired by its strategic location on the crossroads between East and West, the design features a bric-a-brac of cultures and influences, from Europe to Latin America. Handmade patterned tiling is perfectly juxtaposed against the Bertoia side chairs by Knoll in the lobby bar and 2nd floor courtyard. Further beautiful features include the Viennese rocking chair and the indigenous indoor plants which are in perfect harmony with the soft leather and wireframe pieces, and the numerous antiques scattered throughout (especially in the Hemingway-esque library/reading room). There is an indoor courtyard, an outdoor pool with a view over the old town and the ever-changing Panamanian skyline, as well as a small gym. All 50 rooms are different in layout and size, but all feature stunning views of the cathedral, the neighboring colonial streets or the Plaza, high ceilings, large windows or balconies, vintage light switches, and are stocked with soothing Aesop toiletries. The highlight? The wonderful wide planks that make up the floors of all rooms, are nothing else than sunken logs which have been salvaged from the canal. And that is exactly what makes this property so special: Attention to detail, attention to every design feature, elements that blend in and will age well in synch with their surroundings in the charming Casco Viejo. This is the new face of Panama, and it is looking absolutely fabulously chic – in a uniquely Panamanian way.
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{Conceived as a starting point for urban explorers and comfort zone for stressed out city dwellers, The Line Hotel, a full on luxury boutique hotel by the Sydell Group, opened in January 2014 inside a former mid-century hotel on the same site. Located alongside the area’s famous 1940-prebrick colonial revival buildings, it provides an oasis of raw luxury and design right in the middle of L.A.’s never ending urban sprawl. Displaying full sensitivity to its exciting location, designer Sean Knibb has achieved much much more than merely refurbishing and restyling this former middle range hotel dating from the 60s. Based on unpretentious everyday materials such as canvas, raw concrete and wood, the quotidian is cleverly raised to a new level where everyday objects are given a new level of attention whilst the surrounding neighbourhood is paid due homage to through ethnic references. Design - highlights feature repurposed items from 99 cent shops, transformed into design objects seen for example in the chandelier made of plastic balls and the classic design chairs upholstered with colourful Mexican blankets. }
{Conceived as a starting point for urban explorers and comfort zone for stressed out city dwellers, The Line Hotel, a full on luxury boutique hotel by the Sydell Group, opened in January 2014 inside a former mid-century hotel on the same site. Located alongside the area’s famous 1940-prebrick colonial revival buildings, it provides an oasis of raw luxury and design right in the middle of L.A.’s never ending urban sprawl. Displaying full sensitivity to its exciting location, designer Sean Knibb has achieved much much more than merely refurbishing and restyling this former middle range hotel dating from the 60s. Based on unpretentious everyday materials such as canvas, raw concrete and wood, the quotidian is cleverly raised to a new level where everyday objects are given a new level of attention whilst the surrounding neighbourhood is paid due homage to through ethnic references. Design - highlights feature repurposed items from 99 cent shops, transformed into design objects seen for example in the chandelier made of plastic balls and the classic design chairs upholstered with colourful Mexican blankets. }
{Conceived as a starting point for urban explorers and comfort zone for stressed out city dwellers, The Line Hotel, a full on luxury boutique hotel by the Sydell Group, opened in January 2014 inside a former mid-century hotel on the same site. Located alongside the area’s famous 1940-prebrick colonial revival buildings, it provides an oasis of raw luxury and design right in the middle of L.A.’s never ending urban sprawl. Displaying full sensitivity to its exciting location, designer Sean Knibb has achieved much much more than merely refurbishing and restyling this former middle range hotel dating from the 60s. Based on unpretentious everyday materials such as canvas, raw concrete and wood, the quotidian is cleverly raised to a new level where everyday objects are given a new level of attention whilst the surrounding neighbourhood is paid due homage to through ethnic references. Design - highlights feature repurposed items from 99 cent shops, transformed into design objects seen for example in the chandelier made of plastic balls and the classic design chairs upholstered with colourful Mexican blankets. }
{Conceived as a starting point for urban explorers and comfort zone for stressed out city dwellers, The Line Hotel, a full on luxury boutique hotel by the Sydell Group, opened in January 2014 inside a former mid-century hotel on the same site. Located alongside the area’s famous 1940-prebrick colonial revival buildings, it provides an oasis of raw luxury and design right in the middle of L.A.’s never ending urban sprawl. Displaying full sensitivity to its exciting location, designer Sean Knibb has achieved much much more than merely refurbishing and restyling this former middle range hotel dating from the 60s. Based on unpretentious everyday materials such as canvas, raw concrete and wood, the quotidian is cleverly raised to a new level where everyday objects are given a new level of attention whilst the surrounding neighbourhood is paid due homage to through ethnic references. Design - highlights feature repurposed items from 99 cent shops, transformed into design objects seen for example in the chandelier made of plastic balls and the classic design chairs upholstered with colourful Mexican blankets. }
{Conceived as a starting point for urban explorers and comfort zone for stressed out city dwellers, The Line Hotel, a full on luxury boutique hotel by the Sydell Group, opened in January 2014 inside a former mid-century hotel on the same site. Located alongside the area’s famous 1940-prebrick colonial revival buildings, it provides an oasis of raw luxury and design right in the middle of L.A.’s never ending urban sprawl. Displaying full sensitivity to its exciting location, designer Sean Knibb has achieved much much more than merely refurbishing and restyling this former middle range hotel dating from the 60s. Based on unpretentious everyday materials such as canvas, raw concrete and wood, the quotidian is cleverly raised to a new level where everyday objects are given a new level of attention whilst the surrounding neighbourhood is paid due homage to through ethnic references. Design - highlights feature repurposed items from 99 cent shops, transformed into design objects seen for example in the chandelier made of plastic balls and the classic design chairs upholstered with colourful Mexican blankets. }
{Conceived as a starting point for urban explorers and comfort zone for stressed out city dwellers, The Line Hotel, a full on luxury boutique hotel by the Sydell Group, opened in January 2014 inside a former mid-century hotel on the same site. Located alongside the area’s famous 1940-prebrick colonial revival buildings, it provides an oasis of raw luxury and design right in the middle of L.A.’s never ending urban sprawl. Displaying full sensitivity to its exciting location, designer Sean Knibb has achieved much much more than merely refurbishing and restyling this former middle range hotel dating from the 60s. Based on unpretentious everyday materials such as canvas, raw concrete and wood, the quotidian is cleverly raised to a new level where everyday objects are given a new level of attention whilst the surrounding neighbourhood is paid due homage to through ethnic references. Design - highlights feature repurposed items from 99 cent shops, transformed into design objects seen for example in the chandelier made of plastic balls and the classic design chairs upholstered with colourful Mexican blankets. }
{Conceived as a starting point for urban explorers and comfort zone for stressed out city dwellers, The Line Hotel, a full on luxury boutique hotel by the Sydell Group, opened in January 2014 inside a former mid-century hotel on the same site. Located alongside the area’s famous 1940-prebrick colonial revival buildings, it provides an oasis of raw luxury and design right in the middle of L.A.’s never ending urban sprawl. Displaying full sensitivity to its exciting location, designer Sean Knibb has achieved much much more than merely refurbishing and restyling this former middle range hotel dating from the 60s. Based on unpretentious everyday materials such as canvas, raw concrete and wood, the quotidian is cleverly raised to a new level where everyday objects are given a new level of attention whilst the surrounding neighbourhood is paid due homage to through ethnic references. Design - highlights feature repurposed items from 99 cent shops, transformed into design objects seen for example in the chandelier made of plastic balls and the classic design chairs upholstered with colourful Mexican blankets. }
{Conceived as a starting point for urban explorers and comfort zone for stressed out city dwellers, The Line Hotel, a full on luxury boutique hotel by the Sydell Group, opened in January 2014 inside a former mid-century hotel on the same site. Located alongside the area’s famous 1940-prebrick colonial revival buildings, it provides an oasis of raw luxury and design right in the middle of L.A.’s never ending urban sprawl. Displaying full sensitivity to its exciting location, designer Sean Knibb has achieved much much more than merely refurbishing and restyling this former middle range hotel dating from the 60s. Based on unpretentious everyday materials such as canvas, raw concrete and wood, the quotidian is cleverly raised to a new level where everyday objects are given a new level of attention whilst the surrounding neighbourhood is paid due homage to through ethnic references. Design - highlights feature repurposed items from 99 cent shops, transformed into design objects seen for example in the chandelier made of plastic balls and the classic design chairs upholstered with colourful Mexican blankets. }
{Conceived as a starting point for urban explorers and comfort zone for stressed out city dwellers, The Line Hotel, a full on luxury boutique hotel by the Sydell Group, opened in January 2014 inside a former mid-century hotel on the same site. Located alongside the area’s famous 1940-prebrick colonial revival buildings, it provides an oasis of raw luxury and design right in the middle of L.A.’s never ending urban sprawl. Displaying full sensitivity to its exciting location, designer Sean Knibb has achieved much much more than merely refurbishing and restyling this former middle range hotel dating from the 60s. Based on unpretentious everyday materials such as canvas, raw concrete and wood, the quotidian is cleverly raised to a new level where everyday objects are given a new level of attention whilst the surrounding neighbourhood is paid due homage to through ethnic references. Design - highlights feature repurposed items from 99 cent shops, transformed into design objects seen for example in the chandelier made of plastic balls and the classic design chairs upholstered with colourful Mexican blankets. }
{Conceived as a starting point for urban explorers and comfort zone for stressed out city dwellers, The Line Hotel, a full on luxury boutique hotel by the Sydell Group, opened in January 2014 inside a former mid-century hotel on the same site. Located alongside the area’s famous 1940-prebrick colonial revival buildings, it provides an oasis of raw luxury and design right in the middle of L.A.’s never ending urban sprawl. Displaying full sensitivity to its exciting location, designer Sean Knibb has achieved much much more than merely refurbishing and restyling this former middle range hotel dating from the 60s. Based on unpretentious everyday materials such as canvas, raw concrete and wood, the quotidian is cleverly raised to a new level where everyday objects are given a new level of attention whilst the surrounding neighbourhood is paid due homage to through ethnic references. Design - highlights feature repurposed items from 99 cent shops, transformed into design objects seen for example in the chandelier made of plastic balls and the classic design chairs upholstered with colourful Mexican blankets. }