HOUSE & HOMME
{This blog was formerly called Bjorn's Randoms} I'm a Toronto-based interior designer, that's really more than just that. Throughout the weekdays, between 9am to 5pm (EST), I sometimes post things I find online that are usually related to design in some way or the other. But after that, I have the 'randoms' queued up! You see my interest in design, art, illustration, architecture, photography, travel, & fashion, the things that make me laugh, that make me think, the things that excite me, and the things that I love. Soon, it won't be so random after all.
HOUSE & HOMME
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adonisarchive:

Pietro Boselli
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"I began to realize how important it was to be an enthusiast in life. If you are interested in something, no matter what it is, go at it full speed ahead. Embrace it with both arms, hug it, love it and above all become passionate about it. Lukewarm is no good."
Roald Dahl (via sorakeem)
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ryanpanos:

Against Wind and Tide | Nicolas Evariste
ryanpanos:

Against Wind and Tide | Nicolas Evariste
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brvtalisme:

Primary School J.Jaurès II
YOONSEUX Architectes
Livry-Gargan, France
brvtalisme:

Primary School J.Jaurès II
YOONSEUX Architectes
Livry-Gargan, France
brvtalisme:

Primary School J.Jaurès II
YOONSEUX Architectes
Livry-Gargan, France
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archimaps:

Design for a bank building, France
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amoebalanding:

1stdibs Photo Archive Search
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archatlas:

Phoenix House Sebastian Mariscal Studio
archatlas:

Phoenix House Sebastian Mariscal Studio
archatlas:

Phoenix House Sebastian Mariscal Studio
archatlas:

Phoenix House Sebastian Mariscal Studio
archatlas:

Phoenix House Sebastian Mariscal Studio
archatlas:

Phoenix House Sebastian Mariscal Studio
archatlas:

Phoenix House Sebastian Mariscal Studio
archatlas:

Phoenix House Sebastian Mariscal Studio
archatlas:

Phoenix House Sebastian Mariscal Studio
archatlas:

Phoenix House Sebastian Mariscal Studio
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(visit thedapperproject)
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manvanced:

All of our pics are on Twitter. FOLLOW US at http://twitter.com/manvanced
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{The Dean Hotel designed by ASH NYC has a modern take of New England Traditionalism, that feels like a breath of fresh air. I love the simplicity of the forms, contrasted with vintage elements… it almost feels like if Club Monaco had a hotel in Rhode Island (which is where this hotel is).}
{The Dean Hotel designed by ASH NYC has a modern take of New England Traditionalism, that feels like a breath of fresh air. I love the simplicity of the forms, contrasted with vintage elements… it almost feels like if Club Monaco had a hotel in Rhode Island (which is where this hotel is).}
{The Dean Hotel designed by ASH NYC has a modern take of New England Traditionalism, that feels like a breath of fresh air. I love the simplicity of the forms, contrasted with vintage elements… it almost feels like if Club Monaco had a hotel in Rhode Island (which is where this hotel is).}
{The Dean Hotel designed by ASH NYC has a modern take of New England Traditionalism, that feels like a breath of fresh air. I love the simplicity of the forms, contrasted with vintage elements… it almost feels like if Club Monaco had a hotel in Rhode Island (which is where this hotel is).}
{The Dean Hotel designed by ASH NYC has a modern take of New England Traditionalism, that feels like a breath of fresh air. I love the simplicity of the forms, contrasted with vintage elements… it almost feels like if Club Monaco had a hotel in Rhode Island (which is where this hotel is).}
{The Dean Hotel designed by ASH NYC has a modern take of New England Traditionalism, that feels like a breath of fresh air. I love the simplicity of the forms, contrasted with vintage elements… it almost feels like if Club Monaco had a hotel in Rhode Island (which is where this hotel is).}
{The Dean Hotel designed by ASH NYC has a modern take of New England Traditionalism, that feels like a breath of fresh air. I love the simplicity of the forms, contrasted with vintage elements… it almost feels like if Club Monaco had a hotel in Rhode Island (which is where this hotel is).}
{The Dean Hotel designed by ASH NYC has a modern take of New England Traditionalism, that feels like a breath of fresh air. I love the simplicity of the forms, contrasted with vintage elements… it almost feels like if Club Monaco had a hotel in Rhode Island (which is where this hotel is).}
{The Dean Hotel designed by ASH NYC has a modern take of New England Traditionalism, that feels like a breath of fresh air. I love the simplicity of the forms, contrasted with vintage elements… it almost feels like if Club Monaco had a hotel in Rhode Island (which is where this hotel is).}
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{A floating pod is the stand-out feature in this penthouse renovation by Foster Lomas Architects.}
Prior to renovations, poor lighting and a shoddy labyrinth of corridors compromised the beauty and extent of the space. The architects decided to remove the corridors first and stretch the usable space as much as possible. They also made sure to bring about a sense of harmonious fluidity, taking into account the building’s curved geometry.
Meticulous remodeling, reconstruction and redesigning went into the current look of the penthouse and the new mezzanine is definitely one of the apartment’s focal points. A hanging pod inspired by the 1930’s motorboats. The pod is more ovoid than oval and consists of three discrete layers, more or less “step”-like, increasing in dimensions from the bottom to the top. The skeleton of the ‘room’ is made of semi-monocoque plywood and a series of laminated oak cladding panels completes the structure. To top it off, the pod is suspended on just 12 brass tension cables from the ceiling.
The staircase leading up to the mezzanine definitely adds to the visual package. It looks like a helical laser cut ribbon, almost like the major groove of a DNA strand. The spiral staircase and leads to the elevated lounging area where one can simply enjoy the views of Chelsea from the cozy, homey space.
Other rooms in the apartment are also rich with different materials, colors and textures. The master suite has an open plan that treats the bath, shower and bed as objects in an extended landscape. Loosely hanging diaphanous curtains define the dining space. When not in use, the space becomes a part of the kitchen. The apartment system also maintains energy efficiency, has sophisticated light controls, a fully integrated audio-visual system and inbuilt measures to turn off equipment when not in use.
The suspended pod adds a surreal dimension to the space by showcasing a little slice of London, in a big way.
{A floating pod is the stand-out feature in this penthouse renovation by Foster Lomas Architects.}
Prior to renovations, poor lighting and a shoddy labyrinth of corridors compromised the beauty and extent of the space. The architects decided to remove the corridors first and stretch the usable space as much as possible. They also made sure to bring about a sense of harmonious fluidity, taking into account the building’s curved geometry.
Meticulous remodeling, reconstruction and redesigning went into the current look of the penthouse and the new mezzanine is definitely one of the apartment’s focal points. A hanging pod inspired by the 1930’s motorboats. The pod is more ovoid than oval and consists of three discrete layers, more or less “step”-like, increasing in dimensions from the bottom to the top. The skeleton of the ‘room’ is made of semi-monocoque plywood and a series of laminated oak cladding panels completes the structure. To top it off, the pod is suspended on just 12 brass tension cables from the ceiling.
The staircase leading up to the mezzanine definitely adds to the visual package. It looks like a helical laser cut ribbon, almost like the major groove of a DNA strand. The spiral staircase and leads to the elevated lounging area where one can simply enjoy the views of Chelsea from the cozy, homey space.
Other rooms in the apartment are also rich with different materials, colors and textures. The master suite has an open plan that treats the bath, shower and bed as objects in an extended landscape. Loosely hanging diaphanous curtains define the dining space. When not in use, the space becomes a part of the kitchen. The apartment system also maintains energy efficiency, has sophisticated light controls, a fully integrated audio-visual system and inbuilt measures to turn off equipment when not in use.
The suspended pod adds a surreal dimension to the space by showcasing a little slice of London, in a big way.
{A floating pod is the stand-out feature in this penthouse renovation by Foster Lomas Architects.}
Prior to renovations, poor lighting and a shoddy labyrinth of corridors compromised the beauty and extent of the space. The architects decided to remove the corridors first and stretch the usable space as much as possible. They also made sure to bring about a sense of harmonious fluidity, taking into account the building’s curved geometry.
Meticulous remodeling, reconstruction and redesigning went into the current look of the penthouse and the new mezzanine is definitely one of the apartment’s focal points. A hanging pod inspired by the 1930’s motorboats. The pod is more ovoid than oval and consists of three discrete layers, more or less “step”-like, increasing in dimensions from the bottom to the top. The skeleton of the ‘room’ is made of semi-monocoque plywood and a series of laminated oak cladding panels completes the structure. To top it off, the pod is suspended on just 12 brass tension cables from the ceiling.
The staircase leading up to the mezzanine definitely adds to the visual package. It looks like a helical laser cut ribbon, almost like the major groove of a DNA strand. The spiral staircase and leads to the elevated lounging area where one can simply enjoy the views of Chelsea from the cozy, homey space.
Other rooms in the apartment are also rich with different materials, colors and textures. The master suite has an open plan that treats the bath, shower and bed as objects in an extended landscape. Loosely hanging diaphanous curtains define the dining space. When not in use, the space becomes a part of the kitchen. The apartment system also maintains energy efficiency, has sophisticated light controls, a fully integrated audio-visual system and inbuilt measures to turn off equipment when not in use.
The suspended pod adds a surreal dimension to the space by showcasing a little slice of London, in a big way.
{A floating pod is the stand-out feature in this penthouse renovation by Foster Lomas Architects.}
Prior to renovations, poor lighting and a shoddy labyrinth of corridors compromised the beauty and extent of the space. The architects decided to remove the corridors first and stretch the usable space as much as possible. They also made sure to bring about a sense of harmonious fluidity, taking into account the building’s curved geometry.
Meticulous remodeling, reconstruction and redesigning went into the current look of the penthouse and the new mezzanine is definitely one of the apartment’s focal points. A hanging pod inspired by the 1930’s motorboats. The pod is more ovoid than oval and consists of three discrete layers, more or less “step”-like, increasing in dimensions from the bottom to the top. The skeleton of the ‘room’ is made of semi-monocoque plywood and a series of laminated oak cladding panels completes the structure. To top it off, the pod is suspended on just 12 brass tension cables from the ceiling.
The staircase leading up to the mezzanine definitely adds to the visual package. It looks like a helical laser cut ribbon, almost like the major groove of a DNA strand. The spiral staircase and leads to the elevated lounging area where one can simply enjoy the views of Chelsea from the cozy, homey space.
Other rooms in the apartment are also rich with different materials, colors and textures. The master suite has an open plan that treats the bath, shower and bed as objects in an extended landscape. Loosely hanging diaphanous curtains define the dining space. When not in use, the space becomes a part of the kitchen. The apartment system also maintains energy efficiency, has sophisticated light controls, a fully integrated audio-visual system and inbuilt measures to turn off equipment when not in use.
The suspended pod adds a surreal dimension to the space by showcasing a little slice of London, in a big way.
{A floating pod is the stand-out feature in this penthouse renovation by Foster Lomas Architects.}
Prior to renovations, poor lighting and a shoddy labyrinth of corridors compromised the beauty and extent of the space. The architects decided to remove the corridors first and stretch the usable space as much as possible. They also made sure to bring about a sense of harmonious fluidity, taking into account the building’s curved geometry.
Meticulous remodeling, reconstruction and redesigning went into the current look of the penthouse and the new mezzanine is definitely one of the apartment’s focal points. A hanging pod inspired by the 1930’s motorboats. The pod is more ovoid than oval and consists of three discrete layers, more or less “step”-like, increasing in dimensions from the bottom to the top. The skeleton of the ‘room’ is made of semi-monocoque plywood and a series of laminated oak cladding panels completes the structure. To top it off, the pod is suspended on just 12 brass tension cables from the ceiling.
The staircase leading up to the mezzanine definitely adds to the visual package. It looks like a helical laser cut ribbon, almost like the major groove of a DNA strand. The spiral staircase and leads to the elevated lounging area where one can simply enjoy the views of Chelsea from the cozy, homey space.
Other rooms in the apartment are also rich with different materials, colors and textures. The master suite has an open plan that treats the bath, shower and bed as objects in an extended landscape. Loosely hanging diaphanous curtains define the dining space. When not in use, the space becomes a part of the kitchen. The apartment system also maintains energy efficiency, has sophisticated light controls, a fully integrated audio-visual system and inbuilt measures to turn off equipment when not in use.
The suspended pod adds a surreal dimension to the space by showcasing a little slice of London, in a big way.